Spring 2005 QEP Survey and Focus Group Results

The QEP survey and focus group results are the University's first step towards identifying the one student-learning proficiency area that will drive the University's Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP). We are pleased to share these preliminary results.

Table of Contents

I. Faculty QEP Survey Results II. Staff and Student Focus Group Results
III. Our Next Steps  

I. Faculty QEP Survey Results

The QEP Committee has worked diligently over the course of the fall and spring semesters to devise and implement student learning feedback from faculty, staff, and students. A number of focus groups with faculty and staff resulted in a list of 25 student learning domains for further exploration and feedback. The 25 student learning domains were captured in a faculty survey issued to all full-time, part-time (including those on retirement transition), and administrative faculty on campus. Four hundred fifty-five faculty responded to the survey.

I. A. Top Ten Faculty Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas by Frequency

According to the faculty who completed the survey, the ten most frequently identified areas of low student-learning proficiency were:

  1. global awareness (69.8%)
  2. written communication (61.9%)
  3. critical thinking, analysis, and decision-making (58.4%)
  4. quantitative competency (54.4%)
  5. intellectual curiosity (51.8%)
  6. value of broad knowledge and education (48%)
  7. reading with understanding (41.6%)
  8. oral communication (38%)
  9. initiative and resourcefulness (37.5%)
  10. time management (36.6%)

I. B. Top Ten Faculty Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas by Priority

Faculty were then asked to rank the same 25 learning domains by priority which resulted in the following top ten priorities, listed from highest to lowest:

  1. written communication (76.1%)
  2. critical thinking, analysis, and decision- making (73.7%)
  3. oral communication (59.4%)
  4. reading with understanding (59.2%)
  5. integrity (42%)
  6. respect for diverse people and points of view (36.4%)
  7. intellectual curiosity (35.1%)
  8. personal health and wellness (30.8%)
  9. global awareness (29.5%)
  10. initiative and resourcefulness (26.2%)

I. C. Top Three Faculty Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas by Priority

Faculty were asked to write their top three priorities for student learning. Their choices were:

  1. critical thinking, analysis and decision-making (66.5%)
  2. written communication (55.2%)
  3. oral communication (26.2%)

II. Staff and Student Focus Group Results

Additionally, the QEP Committee solicited feedback from staff and students through focus groups. Three staff focus groups included a total of 35 staff members and five student focus groups included a total of 91 students (consisting of both traditional and non-traditional students).

Participants were asked a number of questions, all designed to generate discussion and provide information regarding the selection of a QEP topic. Groups combined previously existing learning domain categories and created new categories in their discussions. Some of these new categories were identified as a top three priority and groups with similar or related content were clustered together.

II. A. Top Five Staff Focus Group Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas

The top five staff priorities for student learning were as follows:

  1. Communication (combined written and oral)
  2. Respect for diversity/respect for individual differences (combined with global awareness and respect for environment)
  3. Integrity (combined with leadership)
  4. Student engagement (combined with career development, leadership, service learning and civic responsibility)
  5. Intellectual curiosity (combined with lifelong learning)

II. B. Top Five Staff Focus Group Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas from QEP Survey

The staff also completed the faculty survey and indicated these domains as top priorities for student learning:

  1. Written Communication*
  2. Critical Thinking
  3. Oral Communication*
  4. Respect for Diversity*
  5. Integrity*

II. C. Top Six Students Focus Group Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas

Following the same procedures, the students’ focus group discussion resulted in six priorities for learning:

  1. Intellectual curiosity and initiative
  2. Communication (combined oral and written)
  3. Leadership
  4. Interpersonal skills
  5. Value of a broad education
  6. Reading with Understanding

II. D. Top Six Students Focus Group Choices for Low Student-Learning proficiency Areas from QEP Survey

The students completed the faculty survey and indicated these as their priority learning domains:

  1. Leadership*
  2. Oral Communication*
  3. Time Management
  4. Professional Behavior
  5. Financial Management
  6. Interpersonal Skills* and Intellectual Curiosity*

* These categories were also identified as priorities at the conclusion of the focus group session when participants were asked to reprioritize the categories based on all of the information shared during the focus group.

III. Our Next Steps

We stress that the QEP process is in the preliminary phase. The committee will continue to analyze the data collected in the QEP Survey along with other data sources available through Institutional Research. We are beginning to see trends, themes, and ways to cluster domains. Our next steps will be to create topical areas for further discussion with the university community during the 2005 fall semester. It will be a busy summer for our committee.

We would like to thank Mike Roberson, James Wells, Josh Reynolds and Stacey Street for development and analysis of the faculty survey and Adrienne Bauer and Carrie Cooper for facilitation and analysis of staff and student focus groups. We would also like to express appreciation to Mary Wilson, Jayne Violette, Sheena Moran, Karen Frohoff, and Laura Melius for internal data analysis.

Published on May 09, 2005

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